Error: no file object

Respect of the citizens interests with the GDPR

With today's May 25, 2018, one of the world's toughest privacy decrees has legally come into force in the European Union. With consequences for data-collecting companies and institutions and with extended rights for the affected citizens.

[Translate to Englisch:] Datenschutzgrundverordnung DSGVO

The Internet has expanded enormously since the beginning of the World Wide Web. At that time there were only static HTML pages and a few computers that could access these websites with Netscape (predecessor of today's Mozillia Firefox). Forms of contact have gradually been added, and pictures were even less personal than they are today. The communication by eMail was still in its infancy. Thus, since 1995, there has been the EU Directive 95/46/EC, which regulated data protection on this basis at that time.
Today, however, our Internet looks completely different. Not only do we shop online, but we have heavily relocated our home and business to online platforms and devices (PCs, laptops, smartphones, tablets) so that our personal information and communications are scattered across different servers around the world. Just by the daily synchronization of servers like Facebook, Google, WhatsApp etc. on other servers for the reliability of these services, our data migrate daily around the globe.

But this also means that with each new server node, the security of our data decreases, because each server node is available to potential cyberattacks. All the more important now is the entry into force of the General Data Protection Regulation (DSGVO / GDPR) of the EU on 25 May 2018, which regulates how companies, public authorities and associations have to deal with personal data.

The General Data Protection Regulation is absolutely necessary and currently it is the world's toughest regulation on data protection with the most powerful fines.
This is also good for us citizens who want to use the innovations of technology. GPS in the smartphone and map services for any place in the world or the constant affliction with the loved ones, even if you are 10000 kilometers away, which is really very convenient and good. It is bad, however, that this data then every administrator of the respective provider can read my current data and continue to process.
The new General Data Protection Regulation should put a stop to this, at least here on European soil. It is to be hoped that other countries in the world will follow with similarly stringent privacy policies.

Understanding

Work has already been carried out in the EU since the first draft from January 2012, which was preceded by two consulate phases. In the summer of 2013, the DSGVO received very much from the publications of intelligence monitoring projects by Edward Snowden. In April 2016, the GDPR was passed by the EU Council of Ministers and the European Parliament, and then came into effect in May 2016. After a two-year transitional period, the GDPR is fully in force on May 25, 2018.


Data bugs like Facebook, Google, Yahoo, WhatsApp, Instagram, and even smaller candidates who want to get rich with the 21st century oil - the data - and who already are, have made this General Data Protection Regulation more than necessary.

Thus, the "right to be forgotten" and the "right to data portability" come fully into force.
The "right to be forgotten" means that each user and citizen can request that all their personal data be permanently deleted when storage is no longer necessary or has been improperly processed.
The "data portability right" allows citizens the right to disclose their personal information in a structured, machine-readable form in order to make it available to another provider. In this context, the companies' obligation to provide information also stands in the event of a data breach or cyberattack. Particular focus is also placed on social networks.

The focus of the General Data Protection Regulation is on the two principles "Privacy by Design" and "Privacy by Default". Thus, privacy must already be at the forefront of software development or service development. In addition, privacy-friendly default settings must be guaranteed.

Who is affected by the General Data Protection Regulation?

Work has already been carried out in the EU since the first draft from January 2012, which was preceded by two consulate phases. In  the summer of 2013, the DSGVO received very much from the publications of intelligence monitoring projects by Edward Snowden. In April 2016,
the GDPR was passed by the EU Council of Ministers and the European Parliament, and then came into effect in May 2016. After a two-year transitional period, the GDPR is fully in force on May 25, 2018.

Data  bugs like Facebook, Google, Yahoo, WhatsApp, Instagram, and even smaller candidates who want to get rich with the 21st century oil - the data - and who already are, have made this General Data Protection Regulation more than necessary.
Thus, the "right to be forgotten" and the "right to data portability" come fully into force.
The "right to be forgotten"  means that each user and citizen can request that all their personal data be permanently deleted when storage is no longer necessary or has been improperly processed.
The "right to data portability" allows citizens the right to disclose their personal information in a structured, machine-readable form in order to make it available to another provider. In this context, the companies' obligation to provide information also stands in the event of a data breach or cyberattack. Particular focus is also placed on social networks.

The focus of the General Data Protection Regulation is on the two principles "Privacy by Design" and "Privacy by Default". Thus, privacy must already be at the forefront of software development or service development. In addition, privacy-friendly default settings must be guaranteed.

Side effects

Although a lot of companies have been in a hurry in the last few days and have asked by e-mail for the consent to data processing. This is also very good and cleansing, because you can do it yourself without having to do anything, delete accounts and your own data that you forgot or you do not want to have anything left to do. And unpleasant newsletters will be released on this journey.

However, that also has its downsides. Because for all companies, this means a huge administrative burden, if now the citizens want to be informed about your data.
I myself have sent me my stored data of a service provider. These were several compressed gigabytes in GPG-encrypted form. That means work of at least 15 minutes.
So companies will only provide their services when the individual citizen gives his consent to data processing. In terms of Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram could go to the point that every post, every image, every video must be released for data processing. Then these service providers are likely to process the data again. If you do not want that, you will probably be locked out of these services in the future. But since we are so networked in the meantime, most people will agree with it or not. It will therefore be important for EU data protection officers to have an eye on the machinations of these Internet giants and to limit the data gathering power of Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and Google even with drastic fines.